Argentina slashes benchmark interest rate to 40%; seventh cut since December

The bank said the cut was based on a slowdown in inflation and that the move was aimed at helping revive economic growth, vital as the country looks to avoid defaulting on its debts.

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Twin Peaks For Gold And Palladium: Which Will Last Longer?

Gold and Palladium, the world’s two most valuable metals, are both charting peaks for 2020. In palladium’s case, it’s a resumption of the record highs seen a month back. Analysts are divided on what to make of the rallies and how much steam they’ll have.

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Does Knowing Whom Others Might Vote For Change Whom You’ll Vote For?

When a presidential race that was supposed to be won by a mainstream moderate instead ends being captured by a far-right gadfly, you better believe pollsters are gonna get some scrutiny. But when this situation took place in the first round of French elections in 2002, bumping the incumbent prime minister from the final round, it wasn’t just the failure of prediction that led to a polling protest. Instead, people were concerned that opinion polling, itself, had caused the outcome.

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CDC Warns Travelers on Hong Kong; Two Die in Iran: Virus Update

Iran said that two elderly patients died, the first fatalities, and the U.S. issued a travel watch for Hong Kong after a second patient died there.

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Is This Fish Winning Climate Change?

This summer, we asked readers to send us their climate change questions. And they did. We received many, many, many climate change questions. So many, in fact, that we’re doing several different projects around them. The main column, Climate Questions from an Adult, explores the business, culture and chemistry behind your pressing climate queries. Today, in another edition of our second column, Who’s Winning Climate Change, we’re diving into the strange stories and complex choices that arise when a warmer planet isn’t 100 percent terrible for everyone.

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EU leaders to clash over money as Brexit blows hole in budget

BRUSSELS (Reuters) – European Union leaders will clash this week over the EU’s 2021-2027 budget as Britain’s exit leaves a 75 billion euro ($81 billion) hole in the bloc’s finances just as it faces costly challenges such as becoming carbon neutral by 2050.

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Puerto Rico government objects to moving forward with new debt plan

The U.S. commonwealth’s federally created financial oversight board had asked Judge Laura Taylor Swain to approve a schedule that would culminate with a confirmation hearing on a so-called plan of adjustment for Puerto Rico’s core government debt and pension obligations commencing in October.

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